The Panama Canal

 

I have lost count of the number of times I have transited the Panama Canal but it never disappoints.

The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is a 48-mile (77.1 km) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Lake Gatun (26m above sea-level) which was used to reduce the amount of work required for a sea-level connection. The current locks are 33.5 metres wide although new larger ones are proposed.

Work on the canal, which began in 1881, was completed in 1914, making it no longer necessary for ships to sail the lengthy Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America (via the Drake Passage) or to navigate the dangerous waters of the Strait of Magellan. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut made it possible for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in half the time previously required. The shorter, faster, safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and along the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy.

During this time, ownership of the territory that is now the Panama Canal was first Colombian, then French and then American before coming under the control of the Panamanian government in 1999. The Panama Canal has seen annual traffic rise from about 1,000 ships when it opened in 1914, to 14,702 vessels in 2008, the latter measuring a total of 309.6 million Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons. By 2008, more than 815,000 vessels had passed through the canal, many of them much larger than the original planners could have envisioned; the largest ships that can transit the canal today are called Panamax.[1] The American Society of Civil Engineers has named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world.[2]

581px-Panama_Canal_Map_EN

In case I do not get a blog an actual blog posted here are some past photos taken by my friend Pinky:

About mrvideo1949

Cruising my retirement!
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2 Responses to The Panama Canal

  1. Ajay Kaul says:

    Great pictures. Thanks for the great description of the canal. I recently cruised through the canal and it was an amazing experience!

  2. Jim Smith says:

    Hi Brad and Gloria, Enjoyed seeing the dinner group photo with so many of those we know. Do give our regards to all. Enjoy the World cruise. We leave for Cuba in 5 days! Jim Smith

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